After SxSW: What We Missed

Written By:

Ross Riley

17th March 2008
At 11:06 GMT

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One of the perks/problems with spending a week Stateside to report on the goings on of South By Southwest week is that we miss out on the normal news activities.

So if you've been busy keeping tabs on our Austin page and thus missed the important news of Michael Jackson keeping his Neverland ranch and other assorted events, you'll be pleased to know we have a complete round-up of the last week's non SxSW related news here.

First up, Bjork will be hitting the U.K this summer for a sole festival date at the Wild in the Country all-dayer, where just maybe she'll continue her battles for democracy. Having done more for democracy in a week than George Bush has managed in eight years, we're not quite sure what she'll be fighting for on her English travels. But needless to say the Wild In The Country bash looks rather hot right now. The event features Bjork of course, as well as Pendulum, Battles, Late Of The Pier and The Field. Tickets are on sale now for £42.50 from here.

Mogwai are set to descend upon England's capital city, with a one-off show in London set for May 12th. Tickets go on sale from the South Bank Centre's website tomorrow (18th March), at 10am.

Trent Reznor continued to cause implosions in the record industry, this time by revealing that his self-released 36-track album has grossed approximately £800,000 for the NIN frontman. The album was released in the same vein of form of Radiohead, but with a few minor differences. The first nine tracks could be downloaded for free from Reznor's website, or you could pay for one of several packages including a "Super Deluxe Limited Edition" boxset, which cost $300.

Weezer have a new album on its way. Rivers Cuomo confirmed the news on the band's website, stating the album is "meaty, crunchy and melodic like a good Weezer album should be." Expect a June release.

And finally, Radiohead frontman Thom Yorke lambasted the Sun for quotes attributed to him regarding the lack of green credentials for Glastonbury. Regarding last month's non-story, he gave a new dimension to what really went on.

He wrote on Radiohead's website: "The last thing i did was talk to a UK newspaper called the Sun which is owned by one of my least favourite people Rupert Murdoch. In the course of the interview I mentioned that we had a carbon footprint study commissioned and the biggest shock was the significance of all the travel to the show by the audience.

"As we have said before we are trying to concentrate as much as we can on playing places with some form of transport infrastructure other than cars and encouraging you lot as politely as we can without sounding preachy to consider car sharing if other things are not available. It is difficult to know how best to go about this. Especially when we are going to have use planes to travel during the tour when there is no alternative. Cue endless meetings and scratching of heads.

"I also mentioned that we were not playing Glastonbury this year but were doing our own shows in London.

"Not because of transport issues but because the festival goers at Glastonbury were more than likely sick of the sight of us... it felt a little early to be doing it again, we felt as if we had only just played there.

"Unfortunately, as is the way with such newspapers my words were taken out of context and implied we were not playing Glastonbury because there was no public transport infrastructure. Well that's bollocks... but these things spread."

He went on to praise the Glastonbury Festival and the Eavis family before cagily admitting the band might play the 2009 bash.

"Have good Glastonbury and maybe see you there in 2009. ? maybe?"

See? There wasn't that much missed. All testement to the pulling power of the South By Southwest Festival. Hopefully we can get over our jet lag and get back to bringing you the best and most relevant music news again.

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